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UC Cooperative Extension

Glenn County

 

Who is UC Cooperative Extension Glenn County?

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The University of California's 64 Cooperative Extension (UCCE) offices are local problem-solving centers. More than 400 campus-based specialists and county-based farm, home, and youth advisors work as teams to bring the University's research-based information to Californians. UCCE is a full partnership of federal, state, county, and private resources linked in applied research and educational outreach. UCCE's many teaching tools include meetings, conferences, workshops, demonstrations, field days, video programs, newsletters and manuals. Thousands of volunteers extend UCCE's outreach, assisting with the California 4-H Youth Development Program and Master Gardener Program.

2023-2024 Donor Campaign 

2023 Program Update

2022 Annual Report

2022 2-Page Report

2022-2023 Donor Campaign 

2022 Program Update

2021 Annual Report

Glenn County UC Cooperative Extension Annual Report 2021
Glenn County UC Cooperative Extension Annual Report 2021

2021 Program Update

UCCE Glenn County Program Update Flyer 2021
UCCE Glenn County Program Update Flyer 2021
UCCE Glenn County Program Update Flyer 2021 pg.2
UCCE Glenn County Program Update Flyer 2021 pg.2

2020 Annual Report

Glenn County UC Cooperative Extension Annual Report 2020
Glenn County UC Cooperative Extension Annual Report 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

UCCE Newsletters

For current and updated information about your specific industry, please subscribe to our newsletters to stay informed of local events and information

 

 

UC Blog
  • UC Davis distinguished emeritus professor Frank Zalom (right) pays tribute to UC Davis distinguished professor James R. Carey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
    James R. Carey: 44-Year Career at UC Davis

    It's not often that an entomologist chalks up a 44-year career of teaching, research and public service. But such is the case with UC Davis distinguished professor James R. Carey. A member of the UC Davis Department of Entomology faculty since...


    By Kathy Keatley Garvey
    Author - Communications specialist
  • Reminder to complete our mailing list and interest survey

    Attention Mendocino & Lake Ranchers, Farmers, Forest Land Owners: Attached is a flier about our survey that some of you may have received. It is very important that you take the time to fill out the survey as it helps us help you. It also help...


    By John M Harper
    Author - Livestock & Natural Resources Advisor - Emeritus
  • A honey bee, its proboscis extended, collects water from the edges of a birdbath. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
    The Water Girls

    If you're struggling with triple-digit temperatures, think about the honey bees. They need to collect water for their colony to cool the hive so their brood can develop. And for other purposes. Just call them "The Water Girls." Lately the bees have...


    By Kathy Keatley Garvey
    Author - Communications specialist
UC Delivers
  • Biological Control Offers Control of Eucalyptus Pest

    The eucalyptus snout beetle, Gonipterus scutellatus, was discovered defoliating eucalyptus trees in Ventura County in March 1994. This insect has been introduced accidentally into several eucalyptus-growing regions around the world from Australia and has caused extensive damage wherever it has become established. Female beetles deposit hard brown egg capsules on shoots and young leaves. Both adults and larvae consume young and tender leaves, buds, and shoots. Extensive feeding completely defoliates trees and kills branches, while intermediate levels of defoliation retard growth and affect tree shape.